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Gender Implications of Countering and Preventing Violent Extremist Programmes
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Existing literature on gender and conflicts provides a broad picture of the diverse ways men and women experience and react to violence as well as the mosaic of influences under which they are prone to resort to violent action. The fourth pillar of UNSCR 1325 focuses on addressing international crises through a gendered lens and calls all actors to not only include the special needs of women but to also adopt a gender perspective. By extension, this raises questions as to whether or not this approach has implications for violent extremism and radicalization. Increasingly, governments with the support of civil society organisations, have engaged in preventing and countering violent extremism (PVE and CVE) as a complement to counter-terrorism efforts. However, very little empirical evidence draws on the effectiveness of these programmes in systematically embedding a gender approach to their design, implementation and monitoring and evaluation systems. This paper aims at shedding some light on the gender dynamics within radicalization and violent extremism, particularly when it comes to understanding female participation and disengagement. It draws experience from case studies including ethno-clinic mediation at Sauvegarde13, the role of state-society relationships and gender at the Commonwealth Secretariat, the importance of gender in educational programmes at Ufuq, developments in reframing civic engagement and the military service and finally investigates Disarmament, Demobilization, Reintegration (DDR) and Community Violence Reduction (CVR) experiences in post-conflict settings. This study consists of an analysis of interviews with social services practitioners who had worked with children and youth at risk of radicalization as well as experts in the field of CVE. Ultimately, the findings will aim at shedding some light on whether or not a gender approach is essential to PVE/CVE and reintegration programmes and if so, how to better take into account the gender implications at the programmatic level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 51
Keywords [en]
gender, radicalisation, extremism, violence, terrorism.
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377267OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-377267DiVA, id: diva2:1289302
Educational program
Master Programme in Religion in Peace and Conflict
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-16 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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