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Wing morphology and migration status, but not body size, habitat or Rapoport's rule predict range size in North-American dragonflies (Odonata: Libellulidae)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Univ Cincinnati, Dept Biol Sci, Cincinnati, OH 45221 USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1296-7273
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
2019 (English)In: Ecography, ISSN 0906-7590, E-ISSN 1600-0587, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 309-320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding why species range sizes vary is important for predicting the impact of environmental change on biodiversity. Here we use a multi-variable approach in a phylogenetic comparative context to understand how four morphological, two ecological, and two eco-geographical variables are associated with range size, latitudinal range and longitudinal range in 81 species of North-American libellulid dragonflies. Our results show that: 1) migratory species and species with a more expanded basal hindwing lobe have a larger range size; 2) opposite to Rapoport's rule, latitudinal range is negatively correlated with mid-range latitude; 3) longitudinal range is predicted by wing morphology and migration; 4) body size and larval habitat are not correlated with range size, latitudinal range or longitudinal range. These results suggest that dispersal-related traits, such as wing shape and migratory status, are important factors in predicting the range size of libellulid dragonflies. In addition, the reverse Rapoport's rule suggests that more northern-centred species might be more specialized than more southern-centred species. We suggest that the variables predicting range size are likely imposed by taxon-specific morphological, ecological, physiological and behavioural traits. Taxon-specific knowledge is thus necessary to understand the dynamics of range sizes and is important to implement successful restoration and conservation plans of threatened species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2019. Vol. 42, no 2, p. 309-320
Keywords [en]
range size, Libellulidae, wing morphology
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377681DOI: 10.1111/ecog.03757ISI: 000457469100008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-377681DiVA, id: diva2:1291691
Funder
Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist ByggmästareAvailable from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved

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Outomuro, DavidJohansson, Frank

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