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Water in the history of Mars: An assessment
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Astrophysics. Polish Acad Sci, Space Res Ctr, Warsaw, Poland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9603-6619
Polish Acad Sci, Space Res Ctr, Warsaw, Poland.
Polish Acad Sci, Space Res Ctr, Warsaw, Poland.
Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, Ctr Star & Planet Format, Copenhagen, Denmark.
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2019 (English)In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 166, p. 70-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a review of recent literature concerning issues related to the origin of water in planet Mars and its role in the geologic evolution of that planet. The baseline case of our discussion is the Grand Tack model of planetary migration in the solar nebula and an early planetary orbital instability according to the Nice Model. This discussion also benefits from a comparison with the Earth's accretional history. Recent observations are used to check the results of planetary accretion models, leading to a new picture of the early history of water on planet Mars. The embryo forming the basis of the planet is found to have been very deficient in water. During the following period, predating the formation of the Earth's Moon, the accreted water may have been as high as ∼5 km Global Equivalent Layer (GEL) while the amount accreted at later times may have been as low as ∼10 m GEL according to recent studies. In particular, the trans-planetary source was insignificant, at whatever time it was active. The proposed resurfacing event creating the Borealis basin could have been important for the loss of a significant part of the early Martian water inventory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 166, p. 70-89
Keywords [en]
Mars, Planet formation, Martian meteorites, D/H ratios, Martian ocean, Impact craters
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-378738DOI: 10.1016/j.pss.2018.08.003ISI: 000458941300006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-378738DiVA, id: diva2:1295204
Funder
Swedish National Space Board, 74/10:2Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-03-11Bibliographically approved

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