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Best Practices Recommendations for Diagnostic Immunohistochemistry in Lung Cancer
Aichi Canc Ctr, Dept Pathol & Mol Diagnost, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.
Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Pathol, Pittsburgh, PA USA.
Weill Cornell Med, Dept Pathol, New York, NY USA.
Inst Pathol Cytopathol & Mol Pathol MVZ UEGP Gies, Wetzlar, Limburg, Germany.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology, ISSN 1556-0864, E-ISSN 1556-1380, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 377-407Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since the 2015 WHO classification was introduced into clinical practice, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has figured prominently in lung cancer diagnosis. In addition to distinction of small cell versus non-small cell carcinoma, patients' treatment of choice is directly linked to histologic subtypes of non-small cell carcinoma, which pertains to IHC results, particularly for poorly differentiated tumors. The use of IHC has improved diagnostic accuracy in the classification of lung carcinoma, but the interpretation of IHC results remains challenging in some instances. Also, pathologists must be aware of many interpretation pitfalls, and the use of IHC should be efficient to spare the tissue for molecular testing. The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Pathology Committee received questions on practical application and interpretation of IHC in lung cancer diagnosis. After discussions in several International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Pathology Committee meetings, the issues and caveats were summarized in terms of 11 key questions covering common and important diagnostic situations in a daily clinical practice with some relevant challenging queries. The questions cover topics such as the best IHC markers for distinguishing NSCLC subtypes, differences in thyroid transcription factor 1 clones, and the utility of IHC in diagnosing uncommon subtypes of lung cancer and distinguishing primary from metastatic tumors. This article provides answers and explanations for the key questions about the use of IHC in diagnosis of lung carcinoma, representing viewpoints of experts in thoracic pathology that should assist the community in the appropriate use of IHC in diagnostic pathology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 14, no 3, p. 377-407
Keywords [en]
Lung cancer, Immunohistochemistry, TTF1, p40, Neuroendocrine markers
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379023DOI: 10.1016/j.jtho.2018.12.005ISI: 000459167100016PubMedID: 30572031OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-379023DiVA, id: diva2:1295666
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved

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