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Liberal Nationalism and Its Critics: Normative and Empirical Questions
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The thesis of liberal nationalism is that national identities can serve as a source of unity in culturally diverse liberal societies, thereby lending support to democracy and social justice.  The chapters in this book examine that thesis from both normative and empirical perspectives, in the latter case using survey data or psychological experiments from the U.S., Canada, the Netherlands, Denmark, France and the UK.  They explore how people understand what it means to belong to their nation, and show that different aspects of national attachment – national identity, national pride and national chauvinism – have contrasting effects on support for redistribution and on attitudes towards immigrants.  The psychological mechanisms that may explain why people’s identity matters for their willingness to extend support to others are examined in depth.   Equally important is how the potential recipients of such support are perceived.  ‘Ethnic’ and ‘civic’ conceptions of national identity are often contrasted, but the empirical basis for such a distinction is shown to be weak.  In their place, a cultural conception of national identity is explored, and defended against the charge that it is ‘essentialist’ and therefore exclusive of minorities.  Particular attention is given to the role that religion can legitimately play within such identities.  Finally the book examines the challenges involved in integrating immigrants, dual nationals and other minorities into the national community.  It shows that although these groups mostly share the liberal values of the majority, their full inclusion depends on whether they are seen as committed and trustworthy members of the national ‘we’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019, in press.
Keywords [en]
chauvinism, culture, essentialism, immigrants, liberal nationalism, national identity, pride, religion, solidarity, trust
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379193OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-379193DiVA, id: diva2:1295947
Available from: 2019-03-13 Created: 2019-03-13 Last updated: 2019-03-13

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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More styles
Language
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  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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