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Association Between Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Body Composition in Middle-Aged and Older Adults
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3992-5812
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 431-435Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The current study sought to examine whether self-reported sleep duration is linked to an adverse body composition in 19,709 adults aged 45 to 75 years.

METHODS: All variables used in the current study were derived from the Swedish EpiHealth cohort study. Habitual sleep duration was measured by questionnaires. Body composition was assessed by bioimpedance. The main outcome variables were fat mass and fat-free mass (in kg). Analysis of covariance adjusting for age, sex, fat mass in the case of fat-free mass (and vice versa), leisure time physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption was used to investigate the association between sleep duration and body composition.

RESULTS: Short sleep (defined as ≤ 5 hours sleep per day) and long sleep (defined as 8 or more hours of sleep per day) were associated with lower fat-free mass and higher fat mass, compared with 6 to 7 hours of sleep duration (P< .05).

CONCLUSIONS: These observations could suggest that both habitual short and long sleep may contribute to two common clinical phenotypes in middle-aged and older humans, ie, body adiposity and sarcopenia. However, the observational nature of our study does not allow for causal interpretation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 15, no 3, p. 431-435
Keywords [en]
body fat, elderly, fat-free mass, middle-aged, sleep
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379286DOI: 10.5664/jcsm.7668ISI: 000461417900009PubMedID: 30853046OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-379286DiVA, id: diva2:1296275
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilNovo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Ernfors FoundationÅke Wiberg Foundation, M17-0088Åke Wiberg Foundation, M18-0169Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2017-00313Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2018-00365Available from: 2019-03-14 Created: 2019-03-14 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved

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Tan, XiaoTitova, Olga E.Lindberg, EvaLind, LarsSchiöth, Helgi B.Benedict, Christian

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Tan, XiaoTitova, Olga E.Lindberg, EvaLind, LarsSchiöth, Helgi B.Benedict, Christian
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