uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
How infants view the world: The functional role of emotional context and maternal affect
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
University of Maryland.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
(English)In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Individual differences in their emotional context may differentially impact infants’ ability to selectively encode and learn from their environment. The current study takes an integrative approach in considering three emotional contexts that have independently been found to modulate infants’ allocation of selective attention: maternal negative affect, infant temperament, and an emotional face prime (the mother and a stranger’s face). The study looked at the effects of that these contexts had on 9-month-old infants’ performance on a subsequent eye-tracking visual search task. Results revealed that infants were faster to find the target after viewing their mother’s angry face or a fearful face, regardless of familiarity. When the mother reported high negative affect, infants’ visual search performance was increasingly impacted by a fearful face, resulting in significantly faster visual search times. The findings demonstrate that both immediate emotional face prime and the mother’s negative affect have the capacity to influence what infants attend to and consequently influence their processing of information in their environment.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379489OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-379489DiVA, id: diva2:1296726
Available from: 2019-03-17 Created: 2019-03-17 Last updated: 2019-03-17
In thesis
1. The perception of actions and interactions: And the importance of context
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The perception of actions and interactions: And the importance of context
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The perception of actions and interactions is a dynamic process linked with perceptual processes, the internal and external states of the individual, prior experiences, and the immediate environment. Given these differential contexts, it is very likely there are differences in how infants perceive, interpret, and respond to actions. The present thesis took a developmental and individual differences approach to understanding action perception and processing in infancy. The overarching aim was to understand the development of action perception and how individual differences contribute to the perception and processing of actions. More specifically, individual differences included the capacity to which variations in a child’s context can affect the development of action perception. Study I demonstrated that, like adults, infants could differentiate between physically possible and physically impossible apparent motion paths, as evidenced by pupil dilation. This perception may be related to the context of whether the motion was performed by a human figure or an object. Study II found that in the context of a more complex social interaction, infants differentiated between appropriate and inappropriate responses to a giving action. Furthermore, infants’ individual differences in perceiving a giving action were related to their own giving behaviors later in childhood, suggesting possible specialized mechanisms. Study III took an integrative perspective on context and demonstrated the joint impact of internal and external emotional contexts for infants’ subsequent selective attention during visual search. Infants’ visual attention was affected by previous exposure to a facial emotion and by the mothers’ negative affect. The results of these three studies demonstrate that given differential environmental contexts and experiences, there are differences in how individuals perceive and interpret actions and interactions. Together, this thesis proposes an integrative role of context in perception and demonstrates that perception can never be truly decontextualized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2019. p. 102
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 1652-9030 ; 164
Keywords
action understanding, action perception, motion, perception, context, environment, eye-tracking, pupil dilation
National Category
Psychology Social Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379490 (URN)978-91-513-0597-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-05-03, Sal IV, Universitetshuset, Biskopsgatan 3, Uppsala, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-03-17 Last updated: 2019-05-07

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

By organisation
Department of Psychology
In the same journal
Developmental Science
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 103 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf