uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Old ways for new days: Australian Indigenous peoples and climate change
Univ Adelaide, Dept Geog, North Terrace, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia;Univ Sunshine Coast, Sustainabil Res Ctr, Sippy Downs, Qld, Australia.
Univ Adelaide, Dept Media, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, SWEDESD - The Swedish International Centre of Education for Sustainable Development. Univ Sunshine Coast, Sustainabil Res Ctr, Sippy Downs, Qld, Australia;Brock Univ, Environm Sustainabil Res Ctr, St Catharines, ON, Canada.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3991-5211
Girringun Aboriginal Corp, Cardwell, Australia.
2019 (English)In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 473-486Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores how Australia's Indigenous peoples understand and respond to climate change impacts on their traditional land and seas. Our results show that: (i) Indigenous peoples are observing modifications to their country due to climate change, and are doing so in both ancient and colonial time scales; (ii) the ways that climate change terminology is discursively understood and used is fundamental to achieving deep engagement and effective adaptive governance; (iii) Indigenous peoples in Australia exhibit a high level of agency via diverse approaches to climate adaptation; and (iv) humour is perceived as an important cultural component of engagement about climate change and adaptation. However, wider governance regimes consistently attempt to "upscale" Indigenous initiatives into their own culturally governed frameworks - or ignore them totally as they "don't fit" within neoliberal policy regimes. We argue that an opportunity exists to acknowledge the ways in which Indigenous peoples are agents of their own change, and to support the strategic localism of Indigenous adaptation approaches through tailored and place-based adaptation for traditional country.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD , 2019. Vol. 24, no 5, p. 473-486
Keywords [en]
Adaptation, agency, Indigenous, climate change, Australia
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382372DOI: 10.1080/13549839.2019.1590325ISI: 000462966800006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-382372DiVA, id: diva2:1306895
Available from: 2019-04-25 Created: 2019-04-25 Last updated: 2019-04-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Smith, Timothy F.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Smith, Timothy F.
By organisation
SWEDESD - The Swedish International Centre of Education for Sustainable Development
In the same journal
Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability
Human Geography

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 52 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf