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Climates of Warm Earth-like Planets: II. Rotational "Goldilocks" Zones for Fractional Habitability and Silicate Weathering
Columbia Univ, Dept Astron, 550 W 120th St, New York, NY 10027 USA.
Columbia Univ, Dept Astron, 550 W 120th St, New York, NY 10027 USA.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Observational Astronomy. NASA, Goddard Inst Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3728-0475
NASA, Goddard Inst Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 USA.
2019 (English)In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 875, no 2, article id 79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Planetary rotation rate has a significant effect on atmospheric circulation, where the strength of the Coriolis effect in part determines the efficiency of latitudinal heat transport, altering cloud distributions, surface temperatures, and precipitation patterns. In this study, we use the ROCKE-3D dynamic ocean general circulation model to study the effects of slow rotations and increased insolations on the "fractional habitability" and silicate weathering rate of an Earth-like world. Defining the fractional habitability fh to be the percentage of a planet's surface that falls in the 0 ≤ T ≤ 100 degrees C temperature regime, we find a moderate increase in fh with a 10% and 20% increase in insolation and a possible maximum in fh at sidereal day lengths between 8 and 32 times that of the modern Earth. By tracking precipitation and runoff, we further determine that there is a rotational regime centered on a 4 day period in which the silicate weathering rate is maximized and is particularly strongly peaked at higher overall insolations. Because of weathering's integral role in the long-term carbonate-silicate cycle, we suggest that climate stability may be strongly affected by the anticipated rotational evolution of temperate terrestrial-type worlds and should be considered a major factor in their study. In light of our results, we argue that planetary rotation period is an important factor to consider when determining the habitability of terrestrial worlds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 875, no 2, article id 79
Keywords [en]
atmospheric effects, methods: numerical, planets and satellites: atmospheres
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382786DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab113dISI: 000465444000001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-382786DiVA, id: diva2:1313266
Available from: 2019-05-02 Created: 2019-05-02 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

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