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Living Anonymous Renal Donors Do Not Regret: Intermediate and Long-Term Follow-Up with a Focus on Motives and Psychosocial Outcomes
Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Transplantat Surg, Huddinge, Sweden;Hamad Med Corp, Dept Surg Transplantat, Doha, Qatar.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Transplant Inst, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Nephrol & Transplant, Malmo, Sweden.
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2019 (English)In: Annals of Transplantation, ISSN 1425-9524, E-ISSN 2329-0358, Vol. 24, p. 234-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Living anonymous donation (LAD) of kidneys was introduced in Sweden in 2004. This study reports on outcomes of Swedish LAD experiences from 2004 to 2016, focusing on donors' motives, the care they received, psychosocial aspects, and medical status at follow-up.

Material/Methods: Donor data were collected through a physician interview, medical check-up, review of medical charts, the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), and a routine national questionnaire. Of the 26 LADs during the study period, 1 donor died and 1 declined to participate, leaving a study population of 24.

Results: Half of the donors were male, which is a higher proportion than for directed living donors. The major motive detected was altruism. Of the 24 LADs, 96% were very satisfied and would donate again if possible, 46% noted increased self-esteem, and a third were happier after the donation. Sixty-two percent received anonymous information about the recipient and 40% would have liked to meet the recipient. HADS scores were normal. Two donors had antidepressant treatment, 1 of whom had received treatment before donation. Half mentioned that the pre-donation assessment took too long. At follow-up, mean eGFR was 62 +/- 12 mL/min/1.73 m(2), of which 16 were in CKD II and 8 were in CKD III. Four donors had developed hypertension, 1 of whom also developed type 2 diabetes.

Conclusions: Swedish LADs are very satisfied and medical outcomes are acceptable. We propose that the transplant community and the National Board of Health and Welfare take a more active approach to informing the general public about LAD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INT SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION, INC , 2019. Vol. 24, p. 234-241
Keywords [en]
Altruism, Kidney Transplantation, Living Donors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383853DOI: 10.12659/AOT.913827ISI: 000467178600001PubMedID: 31023996OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-383853DiVA, id: diva2:1317863
Available from: 2019-05-24 Created: 2019-05-24 Last updated: 2019-05-24Bibliographically approved

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