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Group-Based Relative Deprivation Explains Endorsement of Extremism Among Western-Born Muslims
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Psychol, Box 1225, SE-75142 Uppsala, Sweden;Yale Univ, Dept Psychol, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Harvard Univ, Dept Psychol, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9641-6275
Inst Business Adm, Dept Social Sci & Liberal Arts, Karachi, Pakistan.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2589-7884
2019 (English)In: Psychological Science, ISSN 0956-7976, E-ISSN 1467-9280, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 596-605Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although jihadist threats are regarded as foreign, most Islamist terror attacks in Europe and the United States have been orchestrated by Muslims born and raised in Western societies. In the present research, we explored a link between perceived deprivation of Western Muslims and endorsement of extremism. We suggest that Western-born Muslims are particularly vulnerable to the impact of perceived relative deprivation because comparisons with majority groups' peers are more salient for them than for individuals born elsewhere. Thus, we hypothesized that Western-born, compared with foreign-born, Muslims would score higher on four predictors of extremism (e.g., violent intentions), and group-based deprivation would explain these differences. Studies 1 to 6 (Ns = 59, 232, 259, 243, 104, and 366, respectively) confirmed that Western-born Muslims scored higher on all examined predictors of extremism. Mediation and meta-analysis showed that group-based relative deprivation accounted for these differences. Study 7 (N = 60) showed that these findings are not generalizable to non-Muslims.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC , 2019. Vol. 30, no 4, p. 596-605
Keywords [en]
group-based anger, perceived injustice, group identification, violent behavioral intentions, group-based relative deprivation, birthplace, Muslim extremism, diaspora, open data, open materials, preregistered
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-385572DOI: 10.1177/0956797619834879ISI: 000466927400012PubMedID: 30875267OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-385572DiVA, id: diva2:1326054
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P15-0603:1Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg FoundationAvailable from: 2019-06-17 Created: 2019-06-17 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved

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Obaidi, MilanBergh, RobinAkrami, Nazar

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