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Korsfästelsen som en paradoxal nobel död?: En jämförelse mellan antika framställningar av nobel död och Markusevangeliets passionsberättelse (14:32-15:39)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Old and New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Exegesis.
2019 (Swedish)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Ideas of what constitutes a noble or honorable death have existed since antiquity. In the Greco-Roman world, the death of Socrates (399 BCE) provided a model, or somewhat overlapping models, for what was considered a “noble death” and had significant influence on literature with accounts of deaths of prominent men. This ideal became especially important in accounts during the reigns of Nero, Vespasian and Domitian (54-96 CE). The purpose of this essay is to compare accounts of noble deaths influenced by Socrates death to the passion narrative in the Gospel of Mark.

This study employs a comparative method between Mark and other ancient literature, as well as a narrative approach to the Markan passion narrative. In the analysis of Mark’s narrative rhetorical tools such as irony, ambiguous formulations, and paradoxes, come into focus. The evangelist’s use of those tools sheds light on the story about Jesus’ suffering. It is argued that Mark’s story seeks to persuade the audience that Jesus’s death was noble, albeit for reasons that partially contrast with common tropes in Greco-Roman accounts.

The purpose of this study is to examine whether, and to what extent, Mark may have used the motif and genre of noble death and what that could say about Mark’s compositional strategy. A central conclusion is that Mark selectively builds on the motif of noble death, and that the result of that selective use is a paradoxical presentation of Jesus identity as a royal and suffering Messiah. According to that paradoxical presentation, Jesus’ death was indeed noble, despite the ignoble ordeal of execution by crucifixion. In Marks’ view, it was precisely through that death, which outsiders likely would have deemed ignoble, that Jesus showed that he was Messiah.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 72
Keywords [en]
Greco-Roman biography; Markan passion narrative; narrative criticism; noble death; paradox; Socrates
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387369OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-387369DiVA, id: diva2:1328707
Subject / course
New Testament Exegesis
Presentation
2019-06-07, 13:15 (Swedish)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-06-22 Last updated: 2019-07-22Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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