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Turn-in-interaction including an eye gaze accessed speech generating device
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness.
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The preconditions for communication with eye gaze accessed speech generating device (SGD) is different compared to typical talk-in-interactions. Firstly, gaze practices are needed in the production of the SGD-mediated contribution, which affects the typical use of gaze practices in the face-to-face-interaction. Secondly, the prolonged time producing an SGD-mediated contribution can contribute sequential and temporal challenges for both aided and naturally speaking conversational partners. Consequently, eye gaze accessed SGD-mediated interaction can imply specific challenges for both conversational partners.

 

This study investigated how classroom interaction was organized when an eye gaze accessed SGD was used by one of the participants. The participant using the SGD, Anna, was 15 years and had physical and cognitive disabilities due to cerebral palsy. She communicated through gaze practice, facial expression, vocalization and the SGD. Anna had no oral speech and could not read or write. Data is from a lesson in general sciences. Apart from Anna, there were five other students, three teaching assistants and one teacher in the classroom. All but Anna and another student were aided speaking and used SGDs.

 

Data was collected using video recordings at Anna’s school June 2018. Two cameras were used to capture (1) the SGD screen and (2) Anna and her speaking partner. The interactions were transcribed and analysed using the methods and principles of Conversation Analysis (Sidnell 2012; Higginbotham & Engelke 2013).

 

Overall, data showed that teacher-initiated Initiation-Response-Evaluation sequences (IRE) was frequently used in the classroom. The teacher used naming, pre sequences and reformulations in interaction with Anna. These practises provided a Turn-Relevance-Place in which Anna could respond with the SGD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387780OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-387780DiVA, id: diva2:1330464
Conference
Conversation as a tool, Tönsberg, Norway
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-07-03

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf