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Low stress resilience in late adolescence and risk of smoking, high alcohol consumption and drug use later in life
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Örebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, S-70281 Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0066-4814
Örebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, S-70281 Örebro, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Fac Med, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 496-501Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background While compromised stress resilience constitutes a recognised risk factor for somatic and psychiatric disease development in general, the knowledge about how individual variation in vulnerability to stress may specifically influence the long-term risks of disadvantageous health behaviours is limited. Methods In this Swedish cohort study, we aimed to investigate the association between stress resilience in late adolescence and adult use of addictive substances. We included 9381 men with information on psychological stress resilience measured during military conscription examinations, who later responded to an extensive health survey (mean age 34.0 +/- 7.2 years) including detailed information on substance use. We modelled continuous outcomes using linear regression, binary outcomes with logistic regression and other categorical outcomes with multinomial logistic regression. Results We found that low stress resilience in adolescence conferred increased risks of all studied measures of addictive behaviour. After adjusting for childhood socioeconomic information, low stress resilience was associated with adult current regular smoking (relative risk ratio: 5.85, 95% CI 4.32 to 7.93), higher nicotine dependence scores (beta: 0.76, 95% CI 0.29 to 1.23), hazardous use of alcohol (>14 alcoholic drink-equivalents per week, OR: 1.72, 95% CI 1.37 to 2.16), DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence (OR: 1.74, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.25), and drug use (OR: 1.77, 95% CI 1.51 to 2.08). The results remained largely unchanged after further adjustments for adult educational attainment and occupation as well as for additional conscription covariates. Conclusion Low stress resilience in late adolescence appears to be associated with an increased risk of disadvantageous and addictive health behaviours in adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP , 2019. Vol. 73, no 6, p. 496-501
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Substance Abuse
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390029DOI: 10.1136/jech-2018-211815ISI: 000471850400004PubMedID: 30718261OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-390029DiVA, id: diva2:1340987
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 726413
Note

De två första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2020-01-22Bibliographically approved

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Kennedy, Beatrice

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Molecular epidemiologyScience for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab
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