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An archaeal symbiont-host association from the deep terrestrial subsurface
Univ Duisburg Essen, Biofilm Ctr, Dept Chem, GAME, Duisburg, Germany.
Univ Duisburg Essen, Biofilm Ctr, Dept Chem, GAME, Duisburg, Germany.
Univ Utrecht, Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res NIOZ, Dept Marine Microbiol & Biogeochem MMB, Den Burg, Netherlands.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Utrecht, Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res NIOZ, Dept Marine Microbiol & Biogeochem MMB, Den Burg, Netherlands.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6518-8556
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2019 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 2135-2139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

DPANN archaea have reduced metabolic capacities and are diverse and abundant in deep aquifer ecosystems, yet little is known about their interactions with other microorganisms that reside there. Here, we provide evidence for an archaeal hostsymbiont association from a deep aquifer system at the Colorado Plateau (Utah, USA). The symbiont, Candidatus Huberiarchaeum crystalense, and its host, Ca. Altiarchaeum hamiconexum, show a highly significant co-occurrence pattern over 65 metagenome samples collected over six years. The physical association of the two organisms was confirmed with genome-informed fluorescence in situ hybridization depicting small cocci of Ca. H. crystalense attached to Ca. A. hamiconexum cells. Based on genomic information, Ca. H. crystalense potentially scavenges vitamins, sugars, nucleotides, and reduced redox-equivalents from its host and thus has a similar metabolism as Nanoarchaeum equitans. These results provide insight into host-symbiont interactions among members of two uncultivated archaeal phyla that thrive in a deep subsurface aquifer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP , 2019. Vol. 13, no 8, p. 2135-2139
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Microbiology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390391DOI: 10.1038/s41396-019-0421-0ISI: 000475814500023PubMedID: 31048756OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-390391DiVA, id: diva2:1341560
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Swedish Research Council, 2016-03559Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved

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Spang, Anja

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