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Amenhotep III's Mansion of Millions of Years in Thebes (Luxor, Egypt): Submergence of high grounds by river floods and Nile sediments
Katholieke Univ Leuven, Fac Arts, Egyptol Unit, Leuven, Belgium.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0171-0904
British Museum, Dept Greece & Rome, London, England.
Univ Utrecht, Dept Phys Geog, Utrecht, Netherlands.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 25, p. 195-205Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New Kingdom royal cult temples in Thebes (Luxor, Egypt) are all located on the lower desert edge. Kom el-Hettan (Amenhotep III: reign 1391-1353 BCE, 18th Dynasty) is an exception, as it is located in the present Nile floodplain. Its anomalous position has puzzled Egyptologists, as has the termination of its use, which traditionally has been attributed to natural hazards such as flooding or earthquakes. Geoarchaeological analyses of the subsurface shows that Amenhotep III's temple was initially founded on a wadi fan that stood several metres above the contemporary surrounding floodplain landscape. The temple was fronted by a minor branch of the Nile, which connected the temple to the wider region, but the temple itself was relatively safe from the annual flood of the Nile. This geoarchaeological study comprised a coring programme to determine the c. 4000-yr landscape history of the local area. Chronological control was provided by the analysis of ceramic fragments recovered from within the sediments. This study shows that the New Kingdom period was, at least locally, characterised by extremely high sedimentation rates that caused a rapid rise of the floodplain and gradual submergence of the pre-existing high temple grounds. This is, however, not a plausible reason for the destruction of the temple, as frequent inundation did not begin until the temple was already out of use and largely dismantled.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2019. Vol. 25, p. 195-205
Keywords [en]
New Kingdom, Climate change, Avulsion, Geomorphology, Kom el-Hettan, Ancient Egypt, Ritual landscape
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390654DOI: 10.1016/j.jasrep.2019.03.003ISI: 000473218800019OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-390654DiVA, id: diva2:1342381
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationAvailable from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved

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