uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Prizes and the Organization of Status
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies. 0000-0001-5854-7373.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
2019 (English)In: Organizations Unbound / [ed] Göran Ahrne & Nils Brunsson, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A major foundation of social life rests on the need for approval (e.g., Goode, 1978; Henrich & Gil-White, 2001). Although approval can be given or achieved in many ways, we focus in this chapter on the role and function of prizes as a way of organizing approval. Prizes are ubiquitous today. Consider, for example, the 37th edition of Awards, Honors & Prizes, a directory listing more than 24,000 prizes from over 130 countries (Gale, 2008). This is, presumably, only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping track of the continuous expansion of more and more prizes in virtually every area of social life would seem to be an impossible task. We are, in the words of Best (2008: 1), witnessing a ‘prize proliferation’. The spread of prizes has received a great deal of scholarly attention. Sociologists have focused on the diffusion of prizes into such previously sacred areas of social life as the arts, sculpture, and architecture, noting the attention commanded by prizes and arguing that they are significant drivers of an increasingly commercialized aesthetic realm (e.g., Best, 2008; English, 2005; Street, 2005). Economists (e.g., Frey & Neckermann, 2009; Nalebuff & Stiglitz, 1983) have examined the rapid expansion of prizes within the private sector, viewing prizes as common incentive tools with which to raise the extrinsic motivation and, ultimately, the performance of employees in firms. And management theorists (e.g., Schein, 2010; Trice & Beyer, 1984) have, in a slightly different approach, analysed prizes as parts of ‘cultural toolboxes’ that leaders increasingly use to steer the values, beliefs, and perceptions of subordinates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019.
Keywords [en]
Prizes, Status, Science, Higher Education
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391519OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-391519DiVA, id: diva2:1345365
Available from: 2019-08-23 Created: 2019-08-23 Last updated: 2019-08-23

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Pallas, Josef
By organisation
Department of Business Studies
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 10 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf