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Short sleep, psychosocial work stressors, and measures of obesity: results from an Australian cohort study
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3249-3383
Centre for Study and Treatment of Circadian Rhythms, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada.
School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Short sleep and workplace stress are both established risk factors for overweight and obesity, yet few studies have considered how these two factors may intersect. The aim of this study was to establish the associations between these two exposures and their relative associations with body mass index (kg/m2 ) and waist circumference (cm).

Methods: A cross-sectional design sampled current employees (N=423) from an Australian cohort using a computer-assisted telephone interview and clinic-measured height, weight, and waist circumference. Short sleep (≤6h/ night) was reported by 25.8% of the participants. Psychosocial work stressors were defined using the Job Demand-ControlSupport (JDCS) model and calculated at the subscale level (psychological demands; skill discretion; decision authority; coworker support; supervisor support). General linear models were used to assess associations between short sleep, the JDCS subscales (split at median), and BMI and waist circumference.

Results: Separate analyses identified short sleep and a lack of skill discretion at work as predictors of both BMI and waist circumference. Furthermore, when both predictors were entered in the same model, each was associated with elevated BMI (b=1.79, p=.003; b=1.08, p=.045) and waist circumference (b=4.20, p=.005; b=2.97, p=.028). Short sleep was also associated with high perceived psychological demands at work (b=1.81, p=.003). All models were adjusted for gender, age, work hours, blue vs. white collar job, and household income.

Discussion: These findings indicate the importance of considering the interplay between short sleep and psychosocial work stressors, and their respective associations with measures of overweight Sleep Sci. 2019;12(Supl.3):1-75 26 and obesity. Further research using longitudinal data is needed to model potential mechanisms (e.g., behavioral and physiological). A novel feature was the subscale consideration of the prominent JDCS model of work stress. Advocacy for both improved habitual sleep (e.g., ≥7h/night) and job redesign to increase skill discretion at work may promote lower levels of overweight and obesity for employees.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Idaho, USA, 2019.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392697OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-392697DiVA, id: diva2:1349287
Conference
24th International Symposium on Shiftwork and Working Time
Available from: 2019-09-08 Created: 2019-09-08 Last updated: 2019-09-08

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http://sleepscience.org.br/export-pdf/589/v12s3.pdf

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