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Microcapillary sampling of Baltic Sea copepod gut microbiomes indicates high variability among individuals and the potential for methane production
Leibniz Inst Balt Sea Res, Seestr 15, D-18119 Rostock, Germany.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
Transgen Technol Charite, Berlin, Germany.
Leibniz Inst Balt Sea Res, Seestr 15, D-18119 Rostock, Germany.
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2019 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 95, no 4, article id fiz024Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paradox of methane oversaturation in oxygenated surface water has been described in many pelagic systems and still raises the question of the source. Temora sp. and Acartia sp. commonly dominate the surface and subsurface waters of the central Baltic Sea. It is hypothesised that their gut microbiome at least partly contributes to the methane anomaly in this ecosystem. However, the potential pathway for this methane production remains unclear. Using a microcapillary technique, we successfully overcame the challenge of sampling the gut microbiome of copepods <1 mm. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed differences among the dominant bacterial communities associated with Temora sp. (Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia) and Acartia sp. (Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria) and the surrounding water (Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Verrucomicrobia), but also intraspecific variability. In both copepods, gut-specific prokaryotic taxa and indicative species for methane production pathways (methanogenesis, dimethylsulfoniopropionate or methylphosphonate) were present. The relative abundance of archaea and methanogens was investigated using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction and showed a high variability among copepod individuals, underlining intra- and interspecific differences in copepod-associated prokaryotic communities. Overall, this work highlights that the guts of Temora sp. and Acartia sp. have the potential for methane production but are probably no hotspot.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS , 2019. Vol. 95, no 4, article id fiz024
Keywords [en]
gut microbiome, Baltic Sea, methane, copepod, Acartia sp., Temora sp.
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390280DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fiz024ISI: 000474761500004PubMedID: 30785612OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-390280DiVA, id: diva2:1350972
Funder
German Research Foundation (DFG), LA 1466/10-1German Research Foundation (DFG), SCHM 2530/5-1German Research Foundation (DFG), NLW 1820/4-1Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-12Bibliographically approved

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Strassert, Jürgen F. H.

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