uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Hydroxycinnamic acids in sunflower leaves serve as UV-A screening pigments
Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Bot Inst, Dept Ecophysiol Plants, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Zool Inst, Dept Evolutionary Ecol & Genet, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9480-5261
Leibniz Inst Plant Genet & Crop Plant Res, Dept Physiol & Cell Biol, D-06466 Gatersleben, Germany.
Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Inst Human Nutr & Food Sci, Dept Food Technol, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, ISSN 1474-905X, E-ISSN 1474-9092, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 1649-1659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, which are located in the upper epidermis of plants, are well known to screen ultraviolet radiation, thus protecting the underlying tissue from these harmful wavelengths. Both classes of secondary products complement each other over the UV spectral region according to their absorption spectra: flavonoids are most efficient as UV-A attenuators while hydroxycinnamates (HCAs) screen well within the UV-B region. Analysis of epidermal transmittance revealed a substantial UV-A screen in Helianthus annuus L. cv. Peredovick. Identifying responsible pigments by HPLC-MS, we found surprisingly low amounts of flavonoids but dominant abundance of the HCA derivatives chlorogenic and di-caffeoyl quinic acid. Both display low UV-A absorbance and thus, should contribute only a little to UV-A protection. However, growth at high light led to a decrease of epidermal transmittance at 366 nm of up to 90%. Underpinning the screening role, HCA autofluorescence microscopy revealed storage to occur predominantly in vacuoles of the upper epidermis. UV-A treatment in the absence of D1-repair resulted in photosystem II inactivation proportional to epidermal UV-A transmittance. Our findings suggest that UV-A protection can be achieved solely with HCAs, apparently through accumulation of high amounts of these compounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY , 2019. Vol. 18, no 7, p. 1649-1659
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392869DOI: 10.1039/c8pp00440dISI: 000477947100025PubMedID: 31070613OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-392869DiVA, id: diva2:1354756
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Roemhild, Roderich

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Roemhild, RoderichMock, Hans-PeterBilger, Wolfgang
By organisation
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology
In the same journal
Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences
Food Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 1 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf