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Let's mate here and now - seasonal constraints increase mating efficiency
Polish Acad Sci, Inst Nat Conservat, PL-31120 Krakow, Poland.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2302-2603
Polish Acad Sci, Inst Nat Conservat, PL-31120 Krakow, Poland.
2019 (English)In: Ecological Entomology, ISSN 0307-6946, E-ISSN 1365-2311, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 623-629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

1. Latitudinal climatic conditions shape the length of the mating season and could thus influence reproductive traits. Knowledge of how animals behave along latitudinal clines will increase understanding of the impact of climate on sexual selection and might help in the prediction of whether peripheral populations will spread or shrink in response to changes in climate. 2. This study investigated variation in the mating efficiency of a temperate insect, the emerald damselfly Lestes sponsa, under semi-natural field conditions along a latitudinal gradient covering three regions of the species' distribution: south, central and north. 3. A comparison was done of the proportion of copulating males, the proportion of males that formed tandems but did not copulate (unsuccessful males), and the proportion of males that did not attempt to form a tandem (passive males) in these three regions. 4. It was found that the proportion of copulations was significantly higher at northern latitudes than in the southern and central regions. Southern latitudes had a higher proportion of successful copulations compared with central latitudes. The northern region had a significantly lower frequency of passive males. The southern region had an intermediate proportion of passive males, and the central region had the highest proportion. The proportion of unsuccessful males did not differ between regions. The population density across sites did not affect these results. 5. The study shows that damselflies inhabiting northern populations mate more intensively than individuals from southern and central populations. This suggests that more restrictive environmental conditions during a brief mating season select for higher mating efficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2019. Vol. 44, no 5, p. 623-629
Keywords [en]
Emerald damselfly, Lestes sponsa, reproductive season, seasonal constraints, thermal constraints
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394187DOI: 10.1111/een.12739ISI: 000483813200005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-394187DiVA, id: diva2:1359470
Available from: 2019-10-09 Created: 2019-10-09 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved

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