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Exploring (non‐)meat eating and ‘translated cuisines’ out of home: Evidence from three English cities
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of food studies, nutrition and dietetics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7970-4753
Sustainable Consumption Institute, University of Manchester.
School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies, University of Bristol.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4950-2517
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 25-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Meat production and consumption are major contributors to global greenhouse gas emissionsand other aspects of environmental degradation. It is the aim of this paper to explore meat inthe configuration of main meals eaten out in England across types and styles of cuisine, and toconsider the implications for transition towards less resource intensive ways of eating in thefuture. We show that the odds ratio of eating a dish without red meat is significantly lower inNorth American/European and Near/Middle Eastern cuisines compared to East Asian (with nodifference between South and East Asian), that women are more likely than men to eat fish andpoultry (with no gender differences in vegetarian dishes), that Prestonians are the least likely toselect a vegetarian dish, compared to people in London and Bristol, and that the odds of avegetarian dish compared to red meat is higher among higher managerial workers compared tothe routine manual workers (with no other statistically significant class differences). We suggestthe term ‘translated cuisine’ to refer to cuisines that travel and become incorporated into thepalate of the new food culture, and discuss how this could play a role in transitions toward lessmeat-centered patterns of food consumption in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 44, no 1, p. 25-32
Keywords [en]
climate change, eating out, meat, sustainable consumption, translated cuisines, vegetarian
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395128DOI: 10.1111/ijcs.12542ISI: 000506332700003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-395128DiVA, id: diva2:1360450
Projects
Eating Out
Note

Funded by Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellowship Fund, Kronprinsessan Margarets Minnesfond and Sustainable Consumption Institute.

Available from: 2019-10-13 Created: 2019-10-13 Last updated: 2020-03-24Bibliographically approved

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Neuman, Nicklas

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