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Martyrs of God, Women of Hell: A Thematic-Computational Text Analysis On The Framing of Female Perpetrators of Political Violence
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Within the context of political violence, women are often constructed as victims and rarely as instigators of violence or rational actors. Female perpetrators of political violence appear to threaten deeply held assumptions of women as inherently maternal and pacifist which, by virtue of their sex, appears to render them incapable of the brutal violence that is often considered to be natural, if not expected, of men. As a result, analyses and portrayals of female perpetrators are constructed and mediated through socially constructed assumptions which serve to simultaneously explain and dismiss female engagement in violence without the need to examine or challenge the inherently gendered assumption of women as non-violent. 

 

This study sought to critically deconstruct and analyse the framing of female perpetrators of political violence and extremism through analysing a sample (n=17) of English news articles derived from Western media sources. A Thematic Analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) combined with the computerised text analysis software Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC) identified five overarching themes pertaining to the motivations of female perpetrators through the perspectives of (1) Relationships, (2) Psychological Pathologies, (3) Physical Appearances, (4) Ideology and (5) Motherhood.  The findings revealed that the motivations of female perpetrators were consistently relayed and framed through the use of gendered stereotypes that sought to reduce agency and legitimacy by attributing female involvement in political activism, including violence, to naïve romanticism, vulnerability, mental illness or evil whilst centring the state of womanhood as the primary driving force. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
Extremism, Female, Framing, LIWC, Political Violence, Terrorism, Thematic Analysis, Women
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395065OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-395065DiVA, id: diva2:1361361
Educational program
Master Programme in Religion in Peace and Conflict
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-15 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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