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On the detection of supermassive primordial stars - II. Blue supergiants
Univ Portsmouth, Inst Cosmol & Gravitat, Portsmouth PO1 3FX, Hants, England.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Observational Astronomy.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1096-2636
Univ Portsmouth, Inst Cosmol & Gravitat, Portsmouth PO1 3FX, Hants, England;Univ Vienna, Dept Astrophys, Tuerkenschanzstr 17, A-1180 Vienna, Austria.
Univ Tokyo, Kavli IPMU WPI, UTIAS, Kashiwa, Chiba 2778583, Japan;Univ Tokyo, Sch Sci, Dept Phys, Bunkyo Ku, Tokyo 1130033, Japan;Univ Tokyo, Inst Phys Intelligence, Sch Sci, Bunkyo Ku, Tokyo 1130033, Japan.
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2019 (English)In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 488, no 3, p. 3995-4003Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Supermassive primordial stars in hot, atomically cooling haloes at z similar to 15-20 may have given birth to the first quasars in the Universe. Most simulations of these rapidly accreting stars suggest that they are red, cool hypergiants, but more recent models indicate that some may have been bluer and hotter, with surface temperatures of 20 000-40 000 K. These stars have spectral features that are quite distinct from those of cooler stars and may have different detection limits in the near-infrared today. Here, we present spectra and AB magnitudes for hot, blue supermassive primordial stars calculated with the MUSTY and CLOUDY codes. We find that photometric detections of these stars by the James Webb Space Telescope will be limited to z less than or similar to 10-12, lower redshifts than those at which red stars can be found, because of quenching by their accretion envelopes. With moderate gravitational lensing, Euclid and the Wide-Field Infrared Space Telescope could detect blue supermassive stars out to similar redshifts in wide-field surveys.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS , 2019. Vol. 488, no 3, p. 3995-4003
Keywords [en]
galaxies: formation, galaxies: high-redshift, quasars: supermassive black holes, dark ages, reionization, first stars, early Universe
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394701DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stz1956ISI: 000485158400074OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-394701DiVA, id: diva2:1362022
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 339177Available from: 2019-10-17 Created: 2019-10-17 Last updated: 2019-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Zackrisson, Erik

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