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Sexual violence and Security Sector Reform: An investigation into the effect of gender-sensitive security sector reforms on post-conflict sexual violence.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

In the aftermath of conflict, the legacies of war and the remains of militarized security institutions pose a serious danger to the nation and its civilians. When conflicts end, women are generally at high risk of violence, particularly sexual violence. This study investigates the effect of gender-sensitive security sector reforms on levels of post-conflict sexual violence. By introducing the concept of social control, this thesis argues that when state security sectors adopt gender-sensitive security sector reforms (GSSSRs) the socialization process changes as social control is enforced, which increases the costs of committing sexual violence. The hypothesis of this thesis is as follows; Post-conflict sexual violence committed by state security forces will be lower in countries which have adopted gender-sensitive security sector reforms, compared to countries which have not. In order to test this hypothesis a comparative case study using the method of structured focused comparison was applied. The main findings support the hypothesized relation and indicate that GSSSRs do have an impact on the prevalence of post-conflict sexual violence. More research is needed to investigate other causal paths in order to advance this largely understudied research field.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 68
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395366OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-395366DiVA, id: diva2:1362044
Educational program
Master Programme in Peace and Conflict Studies
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-10-18 Created: 2019-10-17 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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Output format
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  • asciidoc
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