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Plant traits moderate pollen limitation of introduced and native plants: a phylogenetic meta-analysis of global scale
Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Biol, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Biol, Kirchtor 1, D-06108 Halle, Saale, Germany;Halle Jena Leipzig, German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Deutsch Pl 5e, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.
Taizhou Univ, Zhejiang Prov Key Lab Plant Evolutionary Ecol & C, Taizhou City 318000, Peoples R China;Taizhou Univ, Zhejiang Prov Key Lab Plant Evolutionary Ecol & C, Taizhou 318000, Peoples R China.
South Cent Univ Nationalities, Coll Life Sci, Wuhan 430074, Hubei, Peoples R China.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4762-2053
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2019 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 223, no 4, p. 2063-2075Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of pollination in the success of invasive plants needs to be understood because invasives have substantial effects on species interactions and ecosystem functions. Previous research has shown both that reproduction of invasive plants is often pollen limited and that invasive plants can have high seed production, motivating the questions: How do invasive populations maintain reproductive success in spite of pollen limitation? What species traits moderate pollen limitation for invaders? We conducted a phylogenetic meta-analysis with 68 invasive, 50 introduced noninvasive and 1931 native plant populations, across 1249 species. We found that invasive populations with generalist pollination or pollinator dependence were less pollen limited than natives, but invasives and introduced noninvasives did not differ. Invasive species produced 3x fewer ovules/flower and >250x more flowers per plant, compared with their native relatives. While these traits were negatively correlated, consistent with a tradeoff, this did not differ with invasion status. Invasive plants that produce many flowers and have floral generalisation are able to compensate for or avoid pollen limitation, potentially helping to explain the invaders' reproductive successes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2019. Vol. 223, no 4, p. 2063-2075
Keywords [en]
alien plants, invasion, meta-analysis, mutualists, plant reproduction, plant-pollinator interactions, pollen limitation
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396150DOI: 10.1111/nph.15935ISI: 000473917200001PubMedID: 31116447OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-396150DiVA, id: diva2:1366698
Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved

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Rodger, James G.

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