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Diagnostic Performance of Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test and Microscopy Compared with PCR for Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Infections among Primary Schoolchildren in Kibiti District, Eastern Tanzania: An Area with Moderate Malaria Transmission
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Sch Publ Hlth & Social Sci, Dept Parasitol & Med Entomol, POB 65011, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.
Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Sch Publ Hlth & Social Sci, Dept Parasitol & Med Entomol, POB 65011, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania;Hubert Kairuki Mem Univ, Dept Microbiol Immunol & Parasitol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
2019 (English)In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, ISSN 0002-9637, E-ISSN 1476-1645, Vol. 101, no 4, p. 809-811Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A substantial decline of malaria transmission intensity has been observed in sub-Saharan Africa over the past two decades and may affect the diagnostic performance of malaria rapid diagnostic test (mRDT) and microscopy. Diagnostic performance of histidine-rich protein II (HRP-II)/pan-lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH)-based mRDT and microscopy was evaluated against polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection among 316 primary schoolchildren in Kibiti district, in 2016. Polymerase chain reaction detected more cases of P. falciparum infection than mRDT or microscopy. Using PCR as reference, the sensitivity and specificity of mRDT were 75.9% (95% CI = 62.8-86.1) and 96.9% (95% CI = 94.0-98.7), respectively, whereas that of microscopy were 63.8% (95% CI = 50.1-76.0) and 95.7% (95% CI = 92.5-97.9), respectively. Polymerase chain reaction and other molecular methods should be considered for use in schools and other epidemiological surveys as supplement to mRDT or microscopy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SOC TROP MED & HYGIENE , 2019. Vol. 101, no 4, p. 809-811
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396446DOI: 10.4269/ajtmh.19-0394ISI: 000488520700019PubMedID: 31436157OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-396446DiVA, id: diva2:1369810
Available from: 2019-11-13 Created: 2019-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved

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