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Biodiversity loss through speciation collapse: Mechanisms, warning signals, and possible rescue
Yangzhou Univ, Sch Math Sci, Yangzhou 225002, Jiangsu, Peoples R China;Umea Univ, Dept Math & Math Stat, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Theoret Populat Ecol & Evolut Grp, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3221-4559
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2019 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 73, no 8, p. 1504-1516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Speciation is the process that generates biodiversity, but recent empirical findings show that it can also fail, leading to the collapse of two incipient species into one. Here, we elucidate the mechanisms behind speciation collapse using a stochastic individual-based model with explicit genetics. We investigate the impact of two types of environmental disturbance: deteriorated visual conditions, which reduce foraging ability and impede mate choice, and environmental homogenization, which restructures ecological niches. We find that: (1) Species pairs can collapse into a variety of forms including new species pairs, monomorphic or polymorphic generalists, or single specialists. Notably, polymorphic generalist forms may be a transient stage to a monomorphic population; (2) Environmental restoration enables species pairs to reemerge from single generalist forms, but not from single specialist forms; (3) Speciation collapse is up to four orders of magnitude faster than speciation, while the reemergence of species pairs can be as slow as de novo speciation; (4) Although speciation collapse can be predicted from either demographic, phenotypic, or genetic signals, observations of phenotypic changes allow the most general and robust warning signal of speciation collapse. We conclude that factors altering ecological niches can reduce biodiversity by reshaping the ecosystem's evolutionary attractors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2019. Vol. 73, no 8, p. 1504-1516
Keywords [en]
Assortative mating, hybridization, speciation, species diversity, warning signals
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Genetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393743DOI: 10.1111/evo.13736ISI: 000482092600001PubMedID: 30980527OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-393743DiVA, id: diva2:1373115
Note

This article corresponds to VanWallendael A. 2019. Digest: Species collapse from disturbance occurs quickly, and recovery is slow. Evolution. https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13794

Available from: 2019-11-26 Created: 2019-11-26 Last updated: 2019-11-26Bibliographically approved

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