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High birthweight was not associated with altered body composition or impaired glucose tolerance in adulthood
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation, Metabolism and Child Health Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1751-0408
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8413-9274
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation, Metabolism and Child Health Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7540-438x
2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 12, p. 2208-2213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim

To investigate whether a high birthweight was associated with an increased proportion of body fat or with impaired glucose tolerance in adulthood.

Methods

Our cohort comprised 27 subjects with birthweights of 4500 g or more, and 27 controls with birthweights within ±1 standard deviation scores, born at Uppsala University Hospital 1975‐1979. The subjects were 34‐40 years old at the time of study. Anthropometric data was collected, and data on body composition was obtained by air plethysmography and bioimpedance and was estimated with a three‐compartment model. Indirect calorimetry, blood sampling for fasting insulin and glucose as well as a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test were also performed. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using homoeostasis model assessment 2 and Matsuda index.

Results

There were no differences in body mass index, body composition or insulin sensitivity between subjects with a high birthweight and controls.

Conclusion

In this cohort of adult subjects, although limited in size, those born with a moderately high birthweight did not differ from those with birthweights within ±1 standard deviation scores, regarding body composition or glucose tolerance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 108, no 12, p. 2208-2213
Keywords [en]
body composition, glucose tolerance, high birthweight, insulin sensitivity, obesity
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-398820DOI: 10.1111/apa.14928ISI: 000479894000001PubMedID: 31295357OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-398820DiVA, id: diva2:1378737
Funder
Novo NordiskAvailable from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2019-12-13Bibliographically approved

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Wahlström Johnsson, IngerAhlsson, FredrikGustafsson, Jan

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