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Inferring processes of coevolutionary diversification in a community of Panamanian strangler figs and associated pollinating wasps
Iowa State Univ, Dept Ecol Evolut & Organismal Biol, Ames, IA 50011 USA.
Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, Unit 9100,POB 0498,Diplomat PO, Washington, DC 34002 USA.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0449-7814
Columbia Univ, Dept Ecol Evolut & Environm Biol, New York, NY 10027 USA.
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2019 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 73, no 11, p. 2295-2311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The fig and pollinator wasp obligate mutualism is diverse (∼750 described species), ecologically important, and ancient (∼80 Ma). Once thought to be an example of strict one‐to‐one cospeciation, current thinking suggests genera of pollinator wasps codiversify with corresponding sections of figs, but the degree to which cospeciation or other processes contribute to the association at finer scales is unclear. Here, we use genome‐wide sequence data from a community of Panamanian strangler figs and associated wasp pollinators to estimate the relative contributions of four evolutionary processes generating cophylogenetic patterns in this mutualism: cospeciation, host switching, pollinator speciation, and pollinator extinction. Using a model‐based approach adapted from the study of gene family evolution, our results demonstrate the importance of host switching of pollinator wasps at this fine phylogenetic and regional scale. Although we estimate a modest amount of cospeciation, simulations reveal the number of putative cospeciation events to be consistent with what would be expected by chance. Additionally, model selection tests identify host switching as a critical parameter for explaining cophylogenetic patterns in this system. Our study demonstrates a promising approach through which the history of evolutionary association between interacting lineages can be rigorously modeled and tested in a probabilistic phylogenetic framework.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 73, no 11, p. 2295-2311
Keywords [en]
Ficus, host switching, obligate mutualism, Pegoscapus, RADseq, ultraconserved elements
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-398818DOI: 10.1111/evo.13809ISI: 000481202700001PubMedID: 31339553OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-398818DiVA, id: diva2:1378742
Funder
Wenner-Gren FoundationsAvailable from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2019-12-13Bibliographically approved

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Jandér, K. Charlotte

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