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What prevents small-scale fishing and aquaculture households from engaging in alternative livelihoods?: A case study in the Tam Giang lagoon, Viet Nam
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, POB 1096, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1191-0574
2019 (English)In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 182, article id 104943Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The adoption of alternative livelihoods is often considered as an effective way to reduce natural resource exploitation and improve local resource users' well-being. Nevertheless, studies demonstrate that especially for small-scale fishing and aquaculture households it often can be hard to engage in alternative livelihoods. The initiation and reproduction of alternative livelihoods are not straightforward but shaped by various social-economic factors and processes operating at different spatial and temporal scales. Yet, studies frequently limit their analysis to household or extra-household levels. This paper develops a conceptual framework for a cross-scale analysis of livelihood diversification and applies it in a case study of small-scale fisheries and aquacultural livelihoods in the Tam Giang lagoon, Viet Nam to explain how social and ecological processes limit and enable engagement in alternative livelihoods. The framework and case study aim to go beyond the identification of single factors to demonstrate combinations of factors and processes, and how these play out differently for generations. From this study, the paper confirms that improvements in education, labour skills and job availability are necessary for the engagement in alternative livelihoods. It further argues that the success of interventions aimed at diversifying rural livelihoods need to consider generational differences within households, and the specific social and ecological contexts in which households are situated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD , 2019. Vol. 182, article id 104943
Keywords [en]
Alternative livelihoods, Cross-scale interactions, Small-scale aquaculture, Small-scale fisheries, Tam giang lagoon
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400014DOI: 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2019.104943ISI: 000498753700013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-400014DiVA, id: diva2:1380727
Available from: 2019-12-19 Created: 2019-12-19 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved

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Hanh, Tong Thi HaiBoonstra, Wiebren J.

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