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Self-harm, depressive mood, and belonging to a subculture in adolescence
University Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla, Spain.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7576-2275
2019 (English)In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 76, p. 12-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Self-harm in adolescence has consistently been associated with depressive mood. In this study we examined whether the link between depressive mood and self-harming behaviors was moderated by identifying with certain alternative subcultures (hardrockers, punks, and goths), and whether identification with these subcultures added more predictive power over depressive mood when predicting self-harm concurrently and over time.

Method.

Data from a longitudinal study of a community sample of Swedish adolescents (N = 987; 51.67% boys; Mage = 13.94; SD = .74) were examined over one year.

Results.

Cross-sectional analyses using multiple regression analyses showed that depressive mood was the strongest predictor of self-harming behaviors, but that this link was moderated by the adolescents' identification with the alternative subcultures. In addition, subculture identification was a significant predictor of self-harm. The longitudinal analyses again showed that depressive mood was a significant predictor, and that this link was moderated by the adolescents' identification with the alternative subcultures. Separate analyses for the three examined alternative subcultures showed similar results as for analyses conducted for an aggregated measure of subculture identification.

Conclusions.

Depressive mood and high identification with an alternative subculture are co-jointly associated with greater involvement in self-harm than other combinations of depressive mood and subculture identification. These findings highlight the role of social dimensions for self-harming behaviors, such as adolescent subcultures, and they offer suggestions for more effective interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 76, p. 12-19
Keywords [en]
Adolescents Self-harm Depressive mood Alternative Subcultures Peers Peer groups
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Psychology; Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401233DOI: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.08.003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-401233DiVA, id: diva2:1383082
Available from: 2020-01-07 Created: 2020-01-07 Last updated: 2020-01-07

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Stattin, Håkan

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