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Weight gain and blood pressure.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Although the causality of the obesity--hypertension association is established, the potential for prevention is not. We hypothesized that weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life is associated with higher mid-life blood pressure.

METHODS: We investigated the hypothesis using a large contemporaneous population-based mid-life cohort of men and women aged 50-64 years. Recalled body weight at age 20 years was self-reported, and mid-life body weight and office blood pressures were measured in accordance with a detailed protocol.

RESULTS: On average, men had gained 14.9 (95% CI 14.6-15.2) kg of weight, and women 14.6 (95% CI 14.4-14.9) kg, between age 20 years and the mid-life examination, corresponding to 0.40 (95% CI 0.39-0.41) kg/year for men and women. Both weight at age 20 years and weight at the mid-life examination were associated with mid-life blood pressures. On average, a 10 kg weight increase between age 20 years and mid-life was associated with 2.2 (95% CI 0.9-3.5) mmHg higher systolic and 1.7 (95% CI 0.9-2.5) mmHg higher diastolic mid-life blood pressure in men, and 3.2 (2.5-4.0) mmHg higher systolic and 2.4 (1.9-2.9) mmHg higher diastolic mid-life blood pressure in women. Mid-life weight was more closely associated than weight at age 20 years with mid-life blood pressure. For a given mid-life weight, blood pressure was higher in persons with higher weight gain from age 20 years.

CONCLUSION: In sum, weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life was associated with higher mid-life blood pressure. The magnitude of the association indicates a potentially great public health impact of strategies to prevent weight gain throughout adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401350DOI: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000002298PubMedID: 31764589OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-401350DiVA, id: diva2:1383286
Available from: 2020-01-07 Created: 2020-01-07 Last updated: 2020-01-07

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Sundström, JohanLampa, ErikHagström, EmilOldgren, Jonas
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Internal MedicineUCR-Uppsala Clinical Research CenterEndocrine SurgeryDepartment of Medical Sciences
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