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Parents' Experiences of Their Child's Craniosynostosis and the Initial Care Process.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2744-0586
2019 (English)In: The Journal of craniofacial surgery (Print), ISSN 1049-2275, E-ISSN 1536-3732, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 251-256Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Craniosynostosis is usually diagnosed in early infancy. Treatment almost always involves surgery and care is optimally organized around an interdisciplinary team of specialists at a craniofacial center. This study aimed to investigate Swedish parents' experiences of having a child with craniosynostosis and their perceptions of the initial care process. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 20 parents (10 fathers and 10 mothers) of children with nonsyndromic craniosynostosis who were undergoing surgery at the Uppsala Craniofacial Center. A thematic data analysis revealed 6 themes presented in a timeline following the parents' journey from detection of their child's abnormal skull shape to waiting for surgery: Detection of the abnormal skull shape, thoughts, and feelings before the appointment with the craniofacial team, an appointment with the craniofacial team, searching the Internet and social media, waiting for surgery, and suggestions for improvement. Although meeting with the craniofacial team was considered informative, parents expressed concerns about surgery and their infant's long-term prognosis were evident. Most parents had no previous knowledge about craniosynostosis and craniofacial syndromes and wished for more information already at the time of its detection. The Internet was used both at the time of suspicion that something was wrong with the child and later to learn about risks and consequences, alternative treatments and prognosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 31, no 1, p. 251-256
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401371DOI: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000006033PubMedID: 31764563OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-401371DiVA, id: diva2:1383306
Available from: 2020-01-07 Created: 2020-01-07 Last updated: 2020-01-07

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