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The relevance of macroeconomic conditions on concurrent and subsequent alcohol use – results from two Northern Swedish cohorts
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4115-3797
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health. (Livsstil och rehabilitering vid långvarig sjukdom)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3249-3383
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2020 (English)In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1606-6359, E-ISSN 1476-7392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim of this study is to examine the relevance of macroeconomic conditions (boom vs. recession) and own labor market status on alcohol use in youth and midlife.

Method: Two Northern Swedish cohorts, born in either 1965 (boom at age 21 years) or 1973 (recession at age 21 years), included all pupils attending the last grade of compulsory school in Luleå, in 1981 (n = 990) or 1989 (n = 686), respectively. Questionnaires were completed at ages 21 and 43/39 years. Alcohol use was measured as volume of consumption (cl/year) and heavy episodic drinking (HED).

Results: Women aged 21 years during the boom (Cohort65) consumed less alcohol and were less likely to be heavy episodic drinkers at age 21 years compared to those who were exposed to recession at the same age (Cohort73). In men there were no such cohort differences. Women, and to some extent men, in Cohort65 increased their consumption at midlife, whereas this decreased for those in Cohort73. HED decreased in both cohorts, but the decrease was steeper in the recession cohort. Analyses stratified by labor market status revealed between-cohort differences in consumption among women who were either employed or students at baseline; but not for men. Alcohol use for those unemployed did not differ between the cohorts.

Conclusions: In our study, comparing two cohorts that experienced either macroeconomic boom (1986) or recession (1994) at age 21 years in Sweden, the association between individual alcohol use and concurrent unemployment in youth was not affected by macroeconomic conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020.
Keywords [en]
Alcohol, heavy episodic drinking, life course, recession, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-402498DOI: 10.1080/16066359.2019.1708903OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-402498DiVA, id: diva2:1385949
Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://doi.org/10.1080/16066359.2019.1708903

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Berg, NooraVirtanen, PekkaBean, ChristopherHammarström, Anne

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