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"Ghost Introgression" As a Cause of Deep Mitochondrial Divergence in a Bird Species Complex
Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing, Peoples R China;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Life Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China.
Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing, Peoples R China;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Life Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China.
Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing, Peoples R China;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Life Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China.
Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing, Peoples R China;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Life Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China.
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2019 (English)In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 2375-2386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the absence of nuclear-genomic differentiation between two populations, deep mitochondrial divergence (DMD) is a form of mito-nuclear discordance. Such instances of DMD are rare and might variably be explained by unusual cases of female-linked selection, by male-biased dispersal, by "speciation reversal" or by mitochondrial capture through genetic introgression. Here, we analyze DMD in an Asian Phylloscopus leaf warbler (Aves: Phylloscopidae) complex. Bioacoustic, morphological, and genomic data demonstrate close similarity between the taxa affinis and occisinensis, even though DMD previously led to their classification as two distinct species. Using population genomic and comparative genomic methods on 45 whole genomes, including historical reconstructions of effective population size, genomic peaks of differentiation and genomic linkage, we infer that the form affinis is likely the product of a westward expansion in which it replaced a now-extinct congener that was the donor of its mtDNA and small portions of its nuclear genome. This study provides strong evidence of "ghost introgression" as the cause of DMD, and we suggest that "ghost introgression" may be a widely overlooked phenomenon in nature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS , 2019. Vol. 36, no 11, p. 2375-2386
Keywords [en]
speciation, introgression, hybridization, mito-nuclear discordance, ghost mtDNA capture
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Genetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-402653DOI: 10.1093/molbev/msz170ISI: 000504091200001PubMedID: 31364717OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-402653DiVA, id: diva2:1387065
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-04402Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved

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