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Reducing intrusive traumatic memories after emergency caesarean section: A proof-of-principle randomized controlled study
Univ Hosp Lausanne, Dept Woman Mother Child, Lausanne, Switzerland;Univ Hosp Lausanne, Dept Endocrinol Diabet & Metab, Lausanne, Switzerland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9950-9661
Univ Hosp Lausanne, Dept Woman Mother Child, Lausanne, Switzerland.
Univ Hosp Lausanne, Dept Woman Mother Child, Lausanne, Switzerland.
Univ Hosp Lausanne, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Lausanne, Switzerland.
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2017 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 94, p. 36-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Preventative psychological interventions to aid women after traumatic childbirth are needed. This proof of-principle randomized controlled study evaluated whether the number of intrusive traumatic memories mothers experience after emergency caesarean section (ECS) could be reduced by a brief cognitive intervention. 56 women after ECS were randomized to one of two parallel groups in a 1:1 ratio: intervention (usual care plus cognitive task procedure) or control (usual care). The intervention group engaged in a visuospatial task (computer-game 'Tetris' via a handheld gaming device) for 15 min within six hours following their ECS. The primary outcome was the number of intrusive traumatic memories related to the ECS recorded in a diary for the week post-ECS. As predicted, compared with controls, the intervention group reported fewer intrusive traumatic memories (M = 4.77, SD = 10.71 vs. M = 9.22, SD = 10.69, d = 0.647 [95% CI: 0.106,1.182]) over 1 week (intention-to-treat analyses, primary outcome). There was a trend towards reduced acute stress re-experiencing symptoms (d = 0.503 [95% CI: -0.032, 1.033]) after 1 week (intention-to-treat analyses). Times series analysis on daily intrusions data confirmed the predicted difference between groups. 72% of women rated the intervention "rather" to "extremely" acceptable. This represents a first step in the development of an early (and potentially universal) intervention to prevent postnatal posttraumatic stress symptoms that may benefit both mother and child. Clinical trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02502513. (C) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2017. Vol. 94, p. 36-47
Keywords [en]
Posttraumatic stress disorder, Acute stress disorder, Early intervention, Proof-of-principle randomized controlled study, Cognitive, Computerized, Childbirth, Universal intervention, EMILkeypub
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-404767DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2017.03.018ISI: 000403863800004PubMedID: 28453969OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-404767DiVA, id: diva2:1396793
Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-02-26 Last updated: 2020-03-13

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Holmes, Emily A.

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