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Modifying Adolescent Interpretation Biases Through Cognitive Training: Effects on Negative Affect and Stress Appraisals
Univ Oxford, Dept Expt Psychol, Oxford OX1 4AU, England;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Fac Psychol & Educ, Dept Clin Child & Family Studies, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.
MRC Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England. (EMIL)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7319-3112
Univ Oxford, Dept Expt Psychol, Oxford OX1 4AU, England.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8220-3618
2013 (English)In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 602-611Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adolescent anxiety is common, impairing and costly. Given the scale of adolescent anxiety and its impact, fresh innovations for therapy are in demand. Cognitive Bias Modification of Interpretations (CBM-I) studies of adults show that by training individuals to endorse benign interpretations of ambiguous situations can improve anxious mood-states particularly in response towards stress. While, these investigations have been partially extended to adolescents with success, inconsistent training effects on anxious mood-states have been found. The present study investigated whether positive versus negative CBM-I training influenced appraisals of stress, in forty-nine adolescents, aged 15-18. Data supported the plasticity of interpretational styles, with positively-trained adolescents selecting more benign resolutions of new ambiguous situations, than negatively-trained adolescents. Positively-trained adolescents also rated recent stressors as having less impact on their lives than negatively-trained adolescents. Thus, while negative styles may increase negative responses towards stress, positive styles may boost resilience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER , 2013. Vol. 44, no 5, p. 602-611
Keywords [en]
Cognitive bias modification, Interpretational style, Adolescence, Anxiety, Stress reactivity
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405233DOI: 10.1007/s10578-013-0386-6ISI: 000324066600003PubMedID: 23722473OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-405233DiVA, id: diva2:1396926
Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-02-26 Last updated: 2020-02-27Bibliographically approved

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Holmes, Emily A.

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