uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Alleviating distressing intrusive memories in depression: A comparison between computerised cognitive bias modification and cognitive behavioural education
Univ New S Wales, St Vincents Hosp, Clin Res Unit Anxiety & Depress CRUfAD, OBrien Ctr,Sch Psychiat, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6473-9811
Univ New S Wales, Sch Psychol, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia;Sydney Childrens Hosp, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia.
MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge CB2 7EF, England.
MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge CB2 7EF, England. (EMIL)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7319-3112
Show others and affiliations
2014 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 56, p. 60-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Negative appraisals maintain intrusive memories and intrusion-distress in depression, but treatment is underdeveloped. This study compared the efficacy of computerised bias modification positive appraisal training (CBM) versus a therapist-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy session (CB-Education) that both aimed to target and alter negative appraisals of a negative intrusive autobiographical memory. Dysphoric participants (Mean BDI-II = 27.85; N = 60) completed baseline ratings of a negative intrusive memory, negative appraisals and the Impact of Event Scale, and were randomly allocated either one session of CBM, CB-Education, or a no intervention monitoring control condition (Control). Mood and intrusion symptoms were assessed at one week follow-up. For all groups, there were significant reductions over one week in mood (depression and anxiety), memory intrusiveness and negative appraisals. Groups differed in terms of intrusion-related distress, with the CB-Education group showing greatest reduction, followed by the CBM group. The study provides evidence for the link between maladaptive appraisals of intrusive memories and distress in depressed mood. Further, both a single session of CB-Education and (to a lesser degree) CBM are useful in reducing intrusion-related distress. This study may have been underpowered to detect differences and replication is needed with larger samples. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2014. Vol. 56, p. 60-67
Keywords [en]
Intrusive memory, Memory, Depression, Thoughts, Cognitive bias modification, Cognitive behaviour therapy, Imagery
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405226DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2014.03.001ISI: 000337017400009PubMedID: 24685536OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-405226DiVA, id: diva2:1396932
Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-02-26 Last updated: 2020-02-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Holmes, Emily A.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Newby, Jill M.Holmes, Emily A.Moulds, Michelle L.
In the same journal
Behaviour Research and Therapy
Applied Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 2 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf