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Correlates of eating patterns in preschool children after obesity treatment: Secondary findings from a randomized controlled trial
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of food studies, nutrition and dietetics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of food studies, nutrition and dietetics.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background: Diet modifications is key in child obesity treatment. Multiple factors in both child and parents influence children’s diet. Children’s food habits and correlates of these are rarely assessed after obesity treatment.

Methods: Based on secondary analysis of data from the More and Less study, this study aimed to examine correlates of healthy and less healthy eating patterns in pre-schoolers (n=99, mean age 5.2 years, 52% girls) at the 12-month follow-up of obesity treatment. Children’s food intake was reported by parents with an FFQ, eating behaviours with the CEBQ, feeding practices with the CFQ and obesity related problem behaviours with the LBC. Principal component analysis identified a healthy (HD) and a less healthy (LHD) dietary pattern. Multiple linear regression was used to explore correlates between the dietary patterns and subscales of the behaviour related questionnaires. The results were adjusted for child and parental background factors.

Results: Food fussiness was inversely associated to the HD (b= -0.39, 95% CI -0.63 to -0.14, p<0.05) and positively associated to the LHD (b= 0.41, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.66, p<0.05). Enjoyment of Food was positively associated, and Satiety Responsiveness inversely associated, to the HD. These associations were largely unaffected when adjusting for background factors.

Conclusions: Children’s eating behaviours have a larger impact on dietary patterns than parents’ feeding practices and perceptions of obesity related problem behaviours. Assessing eating behaviours can help tailor dietary advice for families in obesity treatment. Reducing food fussiness has the greatest potential to lead to positive changes in dietary patterns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405267OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-405267DiVA, id: diva2:1396999
Educational program
Programme for Clinical Dietetitians
Available from: 2020-03-18 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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Output format
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  • asciidoc
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