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Attention to the body in nonclinical somatoform dissociation depends on emotional state
Univ Manchester, Sch Psychol Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3961-2023
Univ Manchester, Sch Psychol Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
Univ Manchester, Sch Psychol Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8375-4638
Univ Oxford, Warneford Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Oxford, England.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7319-3112
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2010 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 249-257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Unexplained neurological symptoms ("somatoform dissociation") are common in health care settings and associated with disproportionately high levels of distress, disability, and resource utilization. Theory suggests that somatoform dissociation is associated with disturbed attentional processing, but there is a paucity of research in this area and the available evidence is contradictory. Methods: We compared undergraduate participants (n=124) with high and low scores on the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20) on a tactile cueing paradigm measuring the time course of attention to touch, following either a neutral film or a film designed to simulate the emotional effects of trauma exposure. Results: Following the neutral film, high SDQ-20 participants exhibited delayed disengagement from tactile cue stimuli compared to the low SDQ-20 group. Following the "trauma" film, however, the high SDQ-20 group showed attentional effects suggesting avoidance of the tactile stimuli in this condition. Early attention to tactile cues following the trauma film predicted film-related intrusive thoughts after the experiment. Conclusion: These findings suggest that both body vigilance and body avoidance may be involved in the expression of somatoform dissociation. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2010. Vol. 69, no 3, p. 249-257
Keywords [en]
Pseudoneurological symptoms, Medically unexplained symptoms, Attentional bias, Attention, Cue-target task, Trauma film paradigm
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405498DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2010.04.010ISI: 000281262000004PubMedID: 20708447OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-405498DiVA, id: diva2:1403067
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-02-28

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