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Ameliorating Intrusive Memories of Distressing Experiences Using Computerized Reappraisal Training
Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Behav Sci, NL-6525 ED Nijmegen, Netherlands.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4974-505X
Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford OX3 7JX, England.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7319-3112
Cambridgeshire & Peterborough NHS Trust, Peterborough, Cambs, England.
MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Emot Res Grp, Cambridge, England.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7304-2231
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2012 (English)In: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, E-ISSN 1931-1516, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 778-784Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The types of appraisals that follow traumatic experiences have been linked to the emergence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Could changing reappraisals following a stressful event reduce the emergence of PTSD symptoms? The present proof-of-principle study examined whether a nonexplicit, systematic computerized training in reappraisal style following a stressful event (a highly distressing film) could reduce intrusive memories of the film, and symptoms associated with posttraumatic distress over the subsequent week. Participants were trained to adopt a generally positive or negative poststressor appraisal style using a series of scripted vignettes after having been exposed to highly distressing film clips. The training targeted self-efficacy beliefs and reappraisals of secondary emotions (emotions in response to the emotional reactions elicited by the film). Successful appraisal induction was verified using novel vignettes and via change scores on the Post Traumatic Cognitions Inventory. Compared with those trained negatively, those trained positively reported in a diary fewer intrusive memories of the film during the subsequent week, and lower scores on the Impact of Event Scale (a widely used measure of posttraumatic stress symptoms). Results support the use of computerized, nonexplicit, reappraisal training after a stressful event has occurred and provide a platform for future translational studies with clinical populations that have experienced significant real-world stress or trauma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC , 2012. Vol. 12, no 4, p. 778-784
Keywords [en]
reappraisal, emotion regulation, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), cognitive bias modification, trauma film
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405477DOI: 10.1037/a0024992ISI: 000307085800013PubMedID: 21859193OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-405477DiVA, id: diva2:1403096
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-02-28

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Holmes, Emily A.

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