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Trauma-related intrusions and psychosis: An information processing account
UCL, London, England;Univ E Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, Norfolk, England;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England.
UCL, London, England;Univ E Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, Norfolk, England;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England.
MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7319-3112
2005 (English)In: Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, ISSN 1352-4658, E-ISSN 1469-1833, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 139-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is active, current speculation about the relationship between trauma and psychosis. However, little is known about the information-processing mechanisms underlying the development of trauma-related intrusions in this area. Our account highlights the role of contextual integration, i.e. the need for experiential information to be effectively integrated into a temporal and spatial context in order to facilitate voluntary recall. Drawing on existing models of both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychosis (Brewin, 2001; Ehlers and Clark, 2000; Garety et al., 2001; Morrison, 2001), we propose a contextual integration account of trauma-related intrusions. It is argued that the strength of contextual integration, which occurs during encoding, influences the frequency and nature of subsequent intrusive experiences. Consequently, individual differences in schizotypal personality traits, which are known to be associated with levels of contextual integration, are also related to the phenomenology of trauma-related intrusions. Whilst intrusions can be seen to occur within a range of disorders, it is argued that contextual integration may be one key variable in understanding the relationship between an experienced trauma and any consequent psychiatric symptomatology. Implications for clinical interventions aimed at trauma-related psychosis are discussed, along with research aimed at developing the empirical basis for such interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS , 2005. Vol. 33, no 2, p. 139-152
Keywords [en]
posttraumatic stress disorder, psychosis, information processing, trauma, intrusions
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405631DOI: 10.1017/S1352465804001924ISI: 000228679400003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-405631DiVA, id: diva2:1405204
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-02-28

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