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Are there two qualitatively distinct forms of dissociation?: A review and some clinical implications
MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK; Traumatic Stress Clinic, Camden and Islington Mental Health and Social Care Trust, London, UK.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7319-3112
Univ Manchester, Acad Div Clin Psychol, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge CB2 2EF, England;Camden & Islington Mental Hlth & Social Care Trus, Traumat Stress Clin, London, England;Univ London, Inst Psychiat, Dept Med Psychol, London WC1E 7HU, England;UCL, Subdept Clin Hlth Psychol, London WC1E 6BT, England;Univ London, Inst Psychol, Dept Psychol, London WC1E 7HU, England;UCL, Dept Psychol, Hypnosis Unit, London WC1E 6BT, England.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5697-1784
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2005 (English)In: Clinical Psychology Review, ISSN 0272-7358, E-ISSN 1873-7811, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 1-23Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This review aims to clarify the use of the term 'dissociation' in theory, research and clinical practice. Current psychiatric definitions of dissociation are contrasted with recent conceptualizations that have converged on a dichotomy between two qualitatively different phenomena: 'detachment' and 'compartmentalization'. We review some evidence for this distinction within the domains of phenomenology, factor analysis of self-report scales and experimental research. Available evidence supports the distinction but more controlled evaluations are needed. We conclude with recommendations for future research and clinical practice, proposing that using this dichotomy can lead to clearer case formulation and an improved choice of treatment strategy. Examples are provided within Depersonalization Disorder, Conversation Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2005. Vol. 25, no 1, p. 1-23
Keywords [en]
dissociative, dissociation, detachment, compartmentalization, PTSD, amnesia
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405683DOI: 10.1016/j.cpr.2004.08.006ISI: 000226301400001PubMedID: 15596078OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-405683DiVA, id: diva2:1405516
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-02-28

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Holmes, Emily A.

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