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Internal Critique in Muslim Context
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Systematic Theology and Studies in World Views.
2020 (English)In: A Constructive Critique of Religion: Encounterns between Christianity, Islam, and non-religion in Secular Societies / [ed] Mia Lövheim & Mikael Stenmark, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2020, 1, p. 58-72Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

A common perception, of apologetic nature, is that religious criticism is not possible within Islamic theology and jurisprudence. It is based on the notion that in Islam the Quran is regarded as the word of God and thus forever constant. Likewise, the prophetic tradition is seen as something to be followed by Muslims because Muhammad was chosen by God and thus inalienable. It is impossible to ignore the fact that these beliefs have had a firm grip on Muslim thinking, especially in theology and Sharia jurisprudence, but the question is whether they have prevented disparate interpretations and critique within Islam. A look back on the history of Islam shows that Muslims have been involved in a long dispute concerning the supremacy of interpretations in many areas like theology, philosophy, jurisprudence, and even sectarian disagreements. The critique has been expressed in rather harsh words against the opposite camp, which in some cases has gone as far as stamping each other as heretics and renegades.

The critique within Islam is not limited to contemporary Muslim thinkers. We find many historical examples of critical views within Islamic theology and philosophy as well as the broad literary tradition of the Muslim world. Criticism has been designed in different ways. Common to the criticism is its internal character, that is to say, the critics are Muslims themselves. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2020, 1. p. 58-72
Keywords [en]
Internal Critique in Islam, Norm-critical reading, Islamic Theological Ethics
National Category
Religious Studies
Research subject
Systematic Theology and Studies in Worldviews
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-406487ISBN: 978-1-3501-1309-1 (print)ISBN: 978-1-3501-1310-7 (electronic)ISBN: 978-1-3501-1311-4 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-406487DiVA, id: diva2:1413034
Available from: 2020-03-09 Created: 2020-03-09 Last updated: 2020-03-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-06 11:33
Available from 2020-08-06 11:33

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Fazlhashemi, Mohammad

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