uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Extreme Violence and the 'British Way': Colonial Warfare in Perak, Sierra Leone and Sudan
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2626-6582
2020 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study examines the utilisation of extreme violence throughout the British Empire. The role of this violence in the colonisation process is considered in relation to the following three cases: the Perak War (1875–76); the ‘Hut Tax’ Revolt in Sierra Leone (1898–99) and the Anglo-Egyptian War of Reconquest in the Sudan (1896–99). Methods that were used include: looting; the use of collective reprisals on civilians and scorched earth policies; starvation tactics on the enemy as well as the wider population. The decision-making processes that led to atrocities being committed are explored, as well as the significance of individual colonial administrators in outbreaks of violence. The ways in which racial prejudices, the advocacy of a British ‘civilising mission’ and British racial ‘superiority’ informed colonial administrators’ decisions on the ground are considered.

This violence needs to be written back into British history. Moreover, this study argues that such brutalities are relevant within a wider context of European warfare and the genocidal violence of the first half of the twentieth century. Instances of British colonial violence are revealing regarding the dynamics of extreme violence. The book is divided into five sections: first it considers the place of colonial violence within the history of the British Empire; the three case studies follow; the final chapter provides an analysis of the cases studies’ findings and discusses its relevance for our understanding of both European and colonial violence, thereby placing British colonial violence within a wider framework of extreme European violence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2020.
Series
Empire's Other Histories
Keywords [en]
EXTREME VIOLENCE, BRITISH EMPIRE, PERAK, SIERRA LEONE, SUDAN, PUNITIVE VIOLENCE, GENOCIDE STUDIES, COLONIAL GENOCIDE, IMPERIAL HISTORY
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-406633OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-406633DiVA, id: diva2:1413479
Available from: 2020-03-10 Created: 2020-03-10 Last updated: 2020-03-10

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gordon, Michelle
By organisation
The Hugo Valentin Centre
History

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 35 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf