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Priority effects and asymmetric competition in saproxylic cerambycids
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
(English)Manuscript (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

(1) Cerambycidae is one of the main saproxylic (dependent on dead wood) insect families. Two species, common in Sweden, Acanthocinus aedilis and Rhagium inquisitor, that colonize newly dead trees were studied in this experiment.

(2) In a two-way factorial experiment, pairs of beetles were released on caged bolts. Either two pairs of A. aedilis and two pairs of R. inquisitor, or four pairs of only one of the species were released on two occasions, with a 2-week delay between releases. The pairs released on the first occasion therefore had a 2-week priority over the pairs released on the second occasion.

(3) The hypothesis was that this 2-week priority would lead to a priority effect, manifested in offspring number and/or offspring quality.

(4) A priority effect was found in A. aedilis in offspring number and in R. inquisitor in offspring quality. Interspecific competition was asymmetrical with A. aedilis being the superior competitor. Exploitative resource competition rather than intra-guild predation was the most likely explanation.

National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Animal Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-88760OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-88760DiVA: diva2:159026
Available from: 2009-02-06 Created: 2009-02-06 Last updated: 2010-01-14
In thesis
1. Community Assembly and Spatial Ecology of Saproxylic Coleoptera
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community Assembly and Spatial Ecology of Saproxylic Coleoptera
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Community assembly is the process deciding inclusion/exclusion of species in a developing community. Spatial ecology integrates spatial habitat factors with local biotic interactions within a given patch.

I used standardized tree bolts (0.35-1 m long) to sample saproxylic (wood living) beetles in natural and managed forest types.

Density-dependent effects were more intense in old-growth coniferous forest than in burnt forest. The final-state assemblages in these two forest types diverged regarding species composition but converged regarding community structure. The communities also followed forest-type specific assembly trajectories.

Order of arrival can influence the species assemblage, I found priority effects when comparing the reproductive success of two cerambycid species. A two-week head start had a positive effect on fitness in both species. Different fitness components were affected in the two species: offspring number in Acanthocinus aedilis and offspring quality in Rhagium inquisitor.

In birch-living Coleoptera a large part of variance in species composition could be explained by habitat variables (22.9 %), such as forest type, or spatial variables (15.8 %), such as distance apart. The assemblages in deciduous sites responded to distance apart and showed positive spatial autocorrelation up to a distance of 80 km. For assemblages in deciduous sites a metacommunity perspective is warranted – on a surprisingly large scale.

I compared two regions, one more fragmented and one less fragmented, (with 2.2 % more deciduous forest in the landscape). The effects of habitat fragmentation was primarily found in mature coniferous forest. Host-tree patches in this matrix forest were perceived as matrix by the Coleoptera in the more fragmented region but as habitat in the less fragmented region.

Some of my study sites consisted of protected old-growth forest. These were embedded in a landscape dominated by forestry. These protected areas were invaded by generalist species, thriving in managed forests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2009. 36 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 604
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-88765 (URN)978-91-554-7427-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-03-20, Zootissalen, EBC, Villavägen 18, Uppsala, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-02-27 Created: 2009-02-06 Last updated: 2009-03-31Bibliographically approved

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Victorsson, Jonas

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