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Proliferation and deterioration of Rickettsia palindromic elements
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Molecular Evolution.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Molecular Evolution.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Molecular Evolution.
2002 (English)In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 19, no 8, 1234-1243 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been suggested that Rickettsia Palindromic Elements (RPEs) have evolved as selfish DNA that mediate protein sequence evolution by being targeted to genes that code for RNA and proteins. Here, we have examined the phylogenetic depth of two RPEs that are located close to the genes encoding elongation factors Tu (tuf) and G (fus) in Rickettsia. An exceptional organization of the elongation factor genes was found in all 11 species examined, with complete or partial RPEs identified downstream of the tuf gene (RPE-tuf) in six species and of the fus gene (RPE-fus) in 10 species. A phylogenetic reconstruction shows that both RPE-tuf and RPE-fus have evolved in a manner that is consistent with the expected species divergence. The analysis provides evidence for independent loss of RPE-tuf in several species, possibly mediated by short repetitive sequences flanking the site of excision. The remaining RPE-tuf sequences evolve as neutral sequences in different stages of deterioration. Likewise, highly fragmented remnants of the RPE-fus sequence were identified in two species. This suggests that genome-specific differences in the content of RPEs are the result of recent loss rather than recent proliferation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 19, no 8, 1234-1243 p.
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89689PubMedID: 12140235OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-89689DiVA: diva2:161375
Available from: 2002-03-06 Created: 2002-03-06 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Patterns and Processes of Molecular Evolution in Rickettsia
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns and Processes of Molecular Evolution in Rickettsia
2002 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Species of the genus Rickettsia are obligate intracellular parasites of the a-proteobacterial subdivision. It has been suggested that obligate intracellular bacteria have evolved from free-living bacteria with much larger genome sizes. Transitions to intracellular growth habitats are normally associated with radical genomic alterations, particularly genome rearrangements and gene losses.

This thesis presents a comparative study of evolutionary processes such as gene rearrangements, deletions and duplications in a variety of Rickettsia species. The results show that early intrachromosomal recombination events mediated by duplicated genes and short repeats have resulted in deletions as well as rearrangements. For example, an exceptional organization of the elongation factor genes was found in all species examined, suggesting that this rearrangement event occurred at the early stage of the evolution of Rickettsia. Likewise, it was found that a repetitive element, the so-called Rickettsia Palindromic Element (RPE) flourished prior to species divergence in Rickettsia. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis shows that the duplication events that gave rise to the five genes encoding ATP/ADP transporters occurred long before the divergence of the two major groups of Rickettsia. Taken together, this suggests that Rickettsia have been intracellular parasites for an extensive period of time.

A detailed analysis of the patterns of nucleotide changes in genes and intergenic regions among the different species provides evidence for a gradual accumulation of short deletions. This suggests that different distributions of genes and repeated sequences in modern Rickettsia species reflect species-specific differences in rates of deterioration rather than variation in rates of intra-genomic sequence proliferation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2002. 40 p.
Series
Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1104-232X ; 689
Keyword
Developmental biology, Utvecklingsbiologi
National Category
Developmental Biology
Research subject
Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-1789 (URN)91-554-5248-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2002-03-22, Lindahlsalen, Uppsala, 10:00
Opponent
Available from: 2002-03-06 Created: 2002-03-06Bibliographically approved

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