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Vertical Structure in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer and its Implication for the Inertial Dissipation Method
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science.
2003 (English)In: Boundary-layer Meteorology, ISSN 0006-8314, E-ISSN 1573-1472, Vol. 109, no 1, 1-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The structure of the marine atmospheric boundarylayer and the validity ofMonin–Obukhov similarity theory over the seahave been investigated using longterm measurements. Three levels of turbulencemeasurements (at 10 m, 18 mand 26 m) at Östergarnsholm in themiddle of the Baltic Sea have beenanalysed. The results show that turbulentparameters have a strong dependenceon the actual height due to wave influence.The wind profile and thus thenormalised wind gradient are very sensitiveto wave state. The lower part of theboundary layer can be divided into three heightlayers, a wave influenced layerclose to the surface, a transition layer andan undisturbed ‘ordinary’ surfacelayer; the depth of the layers is determinedby the wave state. This heightstructure can, however, not be found for thenormalised dissipation, which is onlya function of the stability, except duringpronounced swell where the actualheight also has to be accounted for. Theresults have implications for the heightvariation of the turbulent kinetic energy(TKE) budget. Thus, the imbalancebetween production and dissipation willalso vary with height according to thevariation of wave state. This, in turn,will of course have strong implicationsfor the inertial dissipation method, inwhich a parameterisation of the TKEbudget is used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 109, no 1, 1-25 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89813DOI: 10.1023/A:1025407109324OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-89813DiVA: diva2:161593
Available from: 2002-04-26 Created: 2002-04-26 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Turbulent Structure of the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Its Implications for the Inertial Dissipation Method
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Turbulent Structure of the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Its Implications for the Inertial Dissipation Method
2002 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In order to improve climate- and weather forecasting models, a better knowledge of the physical processes taking place in the lowest part of the atmosphere over the oceans is essential. In these models it is often assumed that the atmospheric boundary layer over sea behaves in the same way as that over land. But, the results show that the processes over sea are significantly different, which has to be accounted for in the models.

By using long term measurements it is shown that the surface waves play a very important role for the turbulent structure in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. For example, they give rise to a height structure that can not be found over land. A consequence of this is that measurements from a buoy (at a few meters above the surface) need to be treated different than measurements on a ship (at 10-30 m above the surface).

The wave influence affects the turbulent kinetic energy budget. Besides the height dependency, the imbalance between local production and local dissipation is a function of stability, wave age and wind speed, and the commonly assumed balance can therefore be questioned. This has direct implications for the so called inertial dissipation method, a method often used to determine turbulent fluxes over sea with the aid of measurements from ships and buoys. A comparison with the more direct eddy-correlation method at 10 m height gives that the inertial dissipation method works best for near neutral conditions and growing sea.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2002. 26 p.
Series
Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1104-232X ; 704
Keyword
Earth sciences, Geovetenskap
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Meteorology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-1984 (URN)91-554-5294-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2002-05-17, Axel Hambergsalen, Geocentrum, Villav. 16, Uppsala, 10:00
Opponent
Available from: 2002-04-26 Created: 2002-04-26Bibliographically approved

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