uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Wild Populations of a Reef Fish Suffer from the “Nondestructive” Aquarium Trade Fishery
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Animal Ecology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5791-336X
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Animal Ecology.
2003 (English)In: Conservation Biology, ISSN 0888-8892, E-ISSN 1523-1739, Vol. 17, no 3, 910-914 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The commercial fishery for coral reef fish for the aquarium trade has begun to change, at least in some parts of the world, from destructive methods such as cyanide and dynamite fishing to less-destructive methods such as hand-net fishing. However, data on the effects on wild populations of such relatively nondestructive methods is nonexistent. The Banggai cardinalfish (   Pterapogon kauderni ) is a paternal mouthbrooder living in groups of 2–200 individuals in the proximity of sea urchins (   Diadema setosum ). This fish has limited dispersal abilities because it lacks a pelagic larval phase, and it is believed to be endemic to the Banggai archipelago off the east coast of Sulawesi, Indonesia. Since its rediscovery in 1995, the Banggai cardinalfish has become a popular aquarium fish, and thousands have been exported—mainly to North America, Japan, and Europe. To study the effects of the aquarium trade fishery on wild populations of the Banggai cardinalfish, we performed a field study in which we quantified density, age distribution ( quantified as the ratio of numbers of juveniles to adults ) and habitat quality ( i.e., sea urchin density ) at eight sites in the Banggai archipelago. Through interviews with local fishers, we estimated the fishing pressure at each site and related this to data on fish density. We found a marginally significant negative effect of fishing pressure on density of fish and significant negative effects on group size in both sea urchins and fish. We did not find any effect of fishing on fish size structure. To our knowledge this is the first study to compare sites under different amounts of fishing pressure that has demonstrated the negative effects of the aquarium trade on wild populations of reef fish, despite the widespread use of relatively nondestructive fishing methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 17, no 3, 910-914 p.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90790DOI: 10.1046/j.1523-1739.2003.01522.xISI: 000183077800036OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-90790DiVA: diva2:163264
Available from: 2003-09-04 Created: 2003-09-04 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Influence of Mate Quality on Reproductive Decisions in a Fish with Paternal Care
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of Mate Quality on Reproductive Decisions in a Fish with Paternal Care
2003 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Female reproductive decisions have been suggested to be highly influenced by mate quality. I have studied whether offspring quality may be adjusted by females to match the attractiveness of males and how strong control females have over their reproductive investment focusing on egg size. This was done in the Banggai cardinalfish (Pterapogon kauderni), a sex-role reversed obligate paternal mouthbrooder where males invest heavily into reproduction. As this species is suitable for both laboratory experiments and field studies it is an ideal candidate for the study of reproductive investment.

Mating was size-assortative and both males and females benefited from pairing with large partners. However, male size determined the reproductive output of a pair. Females courted large males more intensively and produced larger, but not fewer eggs when mated to large males as compared to small males. Further, this matching of egg size to mate attractiveness may be fast. Female courtship behaviours contained honest information regarding both clutch weight and egg maturity, traits that may be highly important for male mate choice. Surprisingly, males played an important part in territory defence suggesting relatively equal sex-roles in this species. Also, this species showed stable group structures which may be important for the evolution of female plasticity in reproductive investment due to high variance in quality of available mates.

This thesis suggest that females have a remarkable control over their reproductive investments and that male quality may be highly influential on reproductive decisions regarding offspring quality. Furthermore, it suggest that sexual selection may have strong effects on the evolution of egg size and parental care on a whole.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2003. 33 p.
Series
Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1104-232X ; 882
Keyword
Ecology, sexual selection, differential allocation, evolution of egg size and parental care, Ekologi
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-3562 (URN)91-554-5723-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2003-09-26, Ekman salen, Uppsala, 10:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2003-09-04 Created: 2003-09-04 Last updated: 2014-09-26Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Kolm, Niclas

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kolm, Niclas
By organisation
Animal Ecology
In the same journal
Conservation Biology
Biological Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 575 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf